Higher education funding divide grows across Europe

Source: University World News http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20171214081557556

Since the 2008 financial crisis, the divide between higher education systems that increase public funding and those that reduce investment is getting wider in Europe, according to a new report.

The findings of the Public Funding Observatory Report 2017, published by the European University Association or EUA, also show that while 2012 was the year of “deepest crisis” for universities in Europe with the largest number of systems cutting funding, any recovery that can now be detected is slow and fragile.

In addition, the cuts make it harder for universities to compete for European Union funds, the report concluded.

Only 14 systems had higher funding in 2016 than in 2008 and eight of those have a faster growth in student populations compared to the increase in funding. Nineteen systems still had lower levels of direct public funding than at the time of the financial crisis.

During a webinar discussing the findings, Thomas Estermann, EUA’s director for governance, funding and public policy development, said on Wednesday: “We still have 19 systems with lower funding in 2016 than in 2008, and that shows this is a very challenging situation and it takes a very long time to catch up.

“We really would like to make a drastic call for change and encourage national funders to step up investment, really invest, but also invest at the European level, particularly in the period where we discuss the next level of European framework funding.

“Otherwise we will not have a higher education and research area that is competitive at an international level.”

In a separate statement, Estermann said the report shows a handful of countries have made increases that match student numbers and growth in gross domestic product or GDP, while others “need to up their investments to close the gap”.

The impact of cuts on activity areas varies across countries and can affect teaching, research, infrastructure or staff, the report says.

Short-term trends

The analysis of short-term trends reveals four categories of developments:

  • Systems with higher fluctuations in funding patterns,
  • Systems with positive signs of reinvestment after stagnation or decline,
  • Consistently investing systems, and
  • Systems that have continued cutting public funding to universities.

(…continue at http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20171214081557556 )


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